Peers: How Do I Fit In?

Peers: How Do I Fit In?

Father talking to son, Keep showing up, they're still growing up

Many pre-teens and teens feel pressure to fit in with their peers and be part of a group.

Youth might perceive that alcohol is part of that scene or use could be expected of them. Parents know there is enough drama and emotion throughout adolescence without alcohol getting into the mix!

In your continuing conversations, keep sending the message that drinking alcohol underage is illegal, and you expect them not to drink. Give a voice to your expectations. You don’t have to cover everything about the topic at once; it’s better as an ongoing dialogue than a one-time talk.

Alcohol can cause embarrassing situations they would not otherwise get into. Friends and other relationships, like being a teammate, are important during the teen and pre teen years. Alcohol can change behaviors, ruining relationships and reputations.

With your support and encouragement, each teen has their “why” they choose not to drink alcohol. Teens are trying to express themselves in unique and creative ways. Help let their light shine and find their “why.”

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.

 

34th Annual National Leadership Forum

CADCA’s 34th Annual National Leadership Forum

(CADCA) 34th Annual National Leadership Forum

Will County Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition attends CADCA’s 34th Annual National Leadership Forum

Community Anit-drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) 34th Annual National Leadership Forum & Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 20th Prevention Day is organized by Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA)

The National Leadership Forum is the premiere training event for prevention professionals, community leaders, advocates, and experts to convene, share insights, and collaborate on innovative strategies to drive lasting and impactful community change.

The forum was held from Jan 29 – Feb 01, 2024 at Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland, United States of America.

The 34th Annual CADCA Forum Offered:

  • Training from top experts in the field
  • Information, tools and strategies to take your prevention work to the next level
  • The latest science, news and trends on substance misuse issues
  • The opportunity to network with thousands of advocates passionate about prevention
  • Specialized youth leadership training

Moments To See Your Potential

Protect your progress. Drinking isn’t worth the risk.

Moments to See Your Potential

You are so close to your goals. Get there without alcohol.

Underage drinking puts you at risk of legal penalties, including probation, jail time, fines, and losing your driver’s license. It may even affect college scholarships or financial aid.

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.

 

21: Why is Age so Important?

21: Why is Age so Important?

Dad talking with son with text keep showing up, they're still growing up

Many young people wonder why drinking alcohol is not allowed before age 21. Share information with them so they can understand its importance.

It’s not about controlling them but about their health and allowing their brains to fully develop. The longer use is delayed, the better.

Someone who begins drinking as a young teen is four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than someone who waits until adulthood. Some other risks of early alcohol use include:

  • Alcohol poisoning, injuries, violence, or sexual assault
  • Changes in brain development
  • School performance problems and taking other risks such as smoking, drug misuse, and risky sexual behaviors

Keep Showing Up, They’re Still Growing Up.

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.

 

MOMENTS to be in control

MOMENTS to be in control

Happy Teen kids walking and laughing together with text: Moments to be in control

Keep your cool by choosing not to drink.

Alcohol impairs the part of the brain responsible for self-control. It dulls the brain signal that warns people they are making a mistake. Those drinking may know they’re making a bad choice, but alcohol causes them to care less about it. That helps explain why drinking is connected to risky behavior like impaired driving, fighting, and skipping school.

Stay in control by staying away from alcohol. You have what it takes to make great choices.

Inspiring teens:

Greta Thurnburg:
named Person of the Year by Time Magazine for her climate change activism.

Jaylen Arnold:
started his own nonprofit that educates children across the U.S. about preventing bullying.

Marley Dias:
launched the #1000BlackGirlsBooks Twitter campaign to collect and donate books to help Black girls feel seen in children’s books. Source:https://tinyurl.com/59wrefav

Other Steps to Succeed

  • Write down your goals.
  • Look to a role model for inspiration.
  • Keep going, even when you face setbacks.

21: Why is Age so Important?

21: Why is Age so Important?

Dad talking with son with text keep showing up, they're still growing up

Plenty of youth and many adults wonder why drinking alcohol is not allowed until age 21. Share the facts so they can understand the importance of that age requirement.

It’s not about keeping them controlled. It’s to keep their brains and bodies strong so they can fully develop.

Know that anyone can develop an alcohol problem, even a teen. Alcohol use should be delayed as long as possible. Someone who begins drinking as a young teen is four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than another who waits until adulthood.

If this information is new to you, don’t sweat it. When we know better, we can do better.

  • Alcohol can slow reaction time and impair judgment, vision, and coordination.
  • The brain has been shown to develop well into a person’s twenties. Teens are far from that age, and alcohol use could cause changes in their brains while they’re still developing.
  • School performance difficulties and other risky behaviors such as smoking, drug misuse, and risky sexual behaviors are some of the reasons to abstain.

Sources: https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/minimum-legal-drinking-age

Keep Showing Up, They’re Still Growing Up.

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.