Smoke-Free Illinois Act is (SFIA)

Smoke-Free Illinois Act is (SFIA)

Brains: Development Happens.

The Smoke-Free Illinois Act is (SFIA) a state law which protects residents, workers, and visitors from the harmful effects of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and e-cigarette vapor by prohibiting smoking of all forms of combustible tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars, and hookah, and e-cigarettes, vapes, and any other electronic smoking device, in public places and places of employment. In addition to indoor areas, use of these products is banned outdoors within 15 feet from any entrance, exit, window that opens, or ventilation intake of a public place or place of employment. The SFIA has been protecting Illinois residents and visitors from the dangers of secondhand smoke since its enactment on January 1, 2008; e-cigarettes were added to the act beginning January 1, 2024.

The SFIA defines places of employment as any area under the control of a public or private employer that employees are required to occupy, enter, or pass through while on the job. Public places are defined as a portion of any building or vehicle, whether owned by a private or public entity, used by and open to the public. The definition contains a list of many types of public places, including hospitals, restaurants, stores, offices, elevators, indoor theaters, libraries, warehouses, concert halls, public conveyances, meeting rooms, schools, and private clubs. It is not an exhaustive list. All public places meeting the statute’s definition are subject to the requirements of the SFIA.

The SFIA does not apply to traditional tobacco use/smoking that is associated with a recognized religious ceremony, ritual, or activity by American Indians that is held in accordance with the federal American Indian Religious Freedom Act (42 U.S.C. 1996 and 1996a). For more information about traditional tobacco visit the National Native Network https://keepitsacred.itcmi.org/.

Brain: Development Happens.

Brain: Development Happens.

Keep showing up

When your child is small, it’s easy to be acutely aware of their growth patterns and how fast they’re growing. As they age, it’s easy to lose that awareness as they grow in other ways.

Research says brains develop well into the twenties, long after children are typically considered “grown.” Learning some facts about brain development can make you feel more confident when you connect with your teen about not drinking alcohol underage.

  • Alcohol use can affect the areas of the brain responsible for decision-making and judgment.
  • Alcohol use underage “has more potential to disrupt brain function in areas critical to motivation, memory, learning, judgment, and behavior control.”
  • Alcohol use can interfere with how brain cells communicate.

Source: https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/brochures-and-fact-sheets/make-a-difference-child-alcohol Funded in whole or in part by the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery through a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration.

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.

 

MOMENTS to Protect Your Mental Health

MOMENTS to Protect Your Mental Health

Moments to protect your mental health

Illinois teens recognize that alcohol impacts mental health. But do you know how it affects your well-being?

Alcohol is a depressant that affects your brain’s natural level of happiness chemicals like serotonin and dopamine. Also, underage drinking can lead to stressful situations, like problems with parents, performance, school, and the law. These problems can leave you feeling anxious or depressed.

Take care of your mind and avoid alcohol. During tough times, find healthy ways to cope.

Mental health hacks:

  1. Improve your sleep.
  2. Write out your thoughts and feelings.
  3. Call or text 988 if you’re experiencing a mental health crisis.

Source: https://tinyurl.com/8afaukpf | https://tinyurl.com/4ypu46xm | https://tinyurl.com/54erdw66

The Dangers of Underage Drinking

Not only do underage drinkers put themselves in danger, but they also put others in jeopardy if they get behind the wheel or exhibit violent behavior.

Learn more about binge drinking, social hosting and alcohol use disorders in teens.

 

Brains: Development Happens.

Brains: Development Happens.

Brains: Development Happens.

The brain is the epicenter of all life. Without it, we don’t breathe, make decisions, or even move our bodies.

Teens damaging their developing brains by using alcohol underage can have big consequences both now and down the road.

As our children age, we lose track of how fast they’re growing and developing. Research shows the brain develops well into someone’s twenties, long past when children are typically considered grown and longer than many adults realize.

Yes, alcohol can make a person act how they wouldn’t normally, but do you know why? It’s because alcohol can affect the areas of the brain responsible for decision-making and judgment. Alcohol at this age “has more potential to disrupt brain function in areas critical to motivation, memory, learning, judgment, and behavior control.” Alcohol use can interfere with how brain cells communicate.

The Dangers of Underage Drinking

Not only do underage drinkers put themselves in danger, but they also put others in jeopardy if they get behind the wheel or exhibit violent behavior.

Learn more about binge drinking, social hosting and alcohol use disorders in teens.

 

Moments to be True to Yourself

Moments to be True to Yourself

Photo of cheerleaders with text: Moments to be true to yourself.

Not drinking gives you a chance to be the real you.

The real you is cool and capable. Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways, changing how you normally think, feel, and act. These changes can lead to risky behavior, like impaired driving, fighting, or skipping school.

Source: https://bit.ly/3lhBqOo

The Dangers of Underage Drinking

Not only do underage drinkers put themselves in danger, but they also put others in jeopardy if they get behind the wheel or exhibit violent behavior.

Learn more about binge drinking, social hosting and alcohol use disorders in teens.

 

How Do I Fit In?

Peers: How Do I Fit In?

Father with son playing baseball with text: Keep showing up, They're Still Growing Up

Many pre-teens and teens feel the need to fit in with their peers and be part of a group. Some might even perceive that alcohol is a part of that scene.

In your continuing conversations, stress that alcohol use can be problematic, and you do not allow it. Show your interest in their social lives, friends, and keeping them healthy.

  • Alcohol can lead to risky situations your children might not get into if they hadn’t been drinking.
  • Alcohol changes behaviors. It can ruin relationships, reputations, and overall well-being.
  • Teens are strong enough to show the world around them who they really are without being under the influence of alcohol. Teen life is full of ups and downs, don’t let alcohol ride the rollercoaster, too.

Source:
https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/brochures-and-fact-sheets/make-a-difference-child-alcohol
Funded in whole or in part by the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery through a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration.

Talking to Your Kids

Starting the Discussion About Drug and Alcohol Use with Your Kids

Parents face a tough dilemma about substance use: we may want our children to abstain from alcohol and drug use but what do we do if they are not? Besides the effects of substance use on the developing brain, teens using substances may face very serious consequences.

Learn More.